Errol

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  • in reply to: How to recognize species? #48281

    Errol
    Participant

    You could try looking at this site below, just click anywhere on the highlited link:

    https://www.google.de/search?q=nz+butterflies+photos&sa=X&biw=1440&bih=755&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ved=0ahUKEwjwprfMrvvMAhXCN6YKHcpEBnIQ7AkINQ

    Then click on a photo of the one you think you saw and it should have the name of it.

    Good luck.

    in reply to: Poisonous? #48231

    Errol
    Participant

    Yes, sorry to say the whole plant is poisonous. It’s the sticky white fluid that comes out which is the problem, getting it in your eyes can be very dangerous. Always wash your hands after working with this plant, especially if you have contact with the white sap.

    Good luck.

    in reply to: Indoors or out? #48220

    Errol
    Participant

    Surviving the winter: Depends what part of the country you are in, in the far north for example it may survive and even mate. Otherwise if it can find some nectaring flowers when released, it may be able to find the tree/trees where the local Monarchs diapause (semi-hibernate) over winter in your area.

    Keeping it inside in a glasshouse: It would need a glasshouse with plenty of nectaring flowers and or an artificial feeding site – with sugar/honey/soya mixes. The problem with this idea is that it’s likely to batter itself to death, trying to get out and find a mate.

    Good luck.

    in reply to: What is this caterpillar? #48195

    Errol
    Participant

    A pity you can’t get a photo of them, would make identification a lot easier.

    in reply to: Why butterflies die in chrysalis'? #48189

    Errol
    Participant

    Brilliant idea Caryl.

    in reply to: Why butterflies die in chrysalis'? #48133

    Errol
    Participant

    If possible try moving the remainder to somewhere nice and sunny, inside as well too.

    Good luck

    in reply to: Why butterflies die in chrysalis'? #48128

    Errol
    Participant

    Could be any of several reason. It’s too cold, they had a parasite, they skin of the chrysalis dried out, etc.

    Good luck.

    in reply to: Butterfly netting #48095

    Errol
    Participant

    I have used frost cloth and it works fine.

    Good luck

    in reply to: Other types of caterpillars on swan plant #48078

    Errol
    Participant

    It’s most unlikely to be an Admiral caterpillar, unless he was on his way to a food plant and got lost. They eat nettles by the way. My guess is he may be a caterpillar of a magpie moth.

    Good luck.

    in reply to: Damaged Wings #48036

    Errol
    Participant

    Rosie the kindest thing to would be to euthanize it by putting it in a small container and then popping it in your freezer for a few hours.

    in reply to: Painted Lady appearances #48025

    Errol
    Participant

    Good luck with them Norm. I even found one down here in Motueka in early April, first I’d ever seen.

    in reply to: Sighting of rare migrant #48017

    Errol
    Participant

    It would have needed to be blown across the Tasman, not very likely at this time of year.

    Possibly what you saw may have been a Monarch with badly frayed wings, to give the appearance of white tips like the Common and or Striped Tiger has.

    Pity you couldn’t get a photo of it.

    in reply to: My Chrysalis has died #47932

    Errol
    Participant

    The wasps won’t worry a chrysalis.
    But the caterpillars like to make their chrsysalis to hang in the sun for at least part of the day.

    They normally take around 12 – 15 days to hatch out, though this time of year now it’s getting colder it may take a little longer.

    Good luck.

    in reply to: Chrysalis and preying mantis #47920

    Errol
    Participant

    Probably won’t eat a full grown butterfly, but just to be on the safe side – take the pot inside and put it on the windowsill where it gets plenty of sun.


    Errol
    Participant

    Jacqui, I thinks it’s around 5 cm (about 2 inches) that they will start to turn into their chrysalis.

    in reply to: Eaten Wing #47714

    Errol
    Participant

    I’d be very surprised if an earwig did that damage. More likely she’s just broken a piece off when drying out her wings after hatching.

    in reply to: Bent butterfly wings, hatched yesterday, how to fix? #47674

    Errol
    Participant

    There are several instructional video clips on YouTube, on how to repair/remodel damaged butterfly wings. Have a look at them at see if that helps.

    Good luck.

    in reply to: Too cold for caterpillars? #47643

    Errol
    Participant

    I’m in the South Island, Motueka, and still have caterpillars growing into chrsyalis, then hatching out. And we have cooler nights here than Auckland, all the same it won’t hurt to bring them inside and put them in the castles.

    in reply to: Breeding red admiral butterflies to release around home #47606

    Errol
    Participant

    I can’t see any harm in capturing some Red Admirals, especially as you intend to breed them. But there’s few Reds around, most likely you’ll end up with some Yellow Admirals. Even those are good to breed.

    Good luck

    in reply to: spare nettles please? Admiral babies to feed #47399

    Errol
    Participant

    Might be an idea to wash the nettle cuttings under the tap with cold water. To remove any nasties that may be lurking in the leaves – such as tiny spiderlings. Perhaps even leave the cuttings soaking under water for an hour or two?

    Good luck.

    in reply to: think I have admiral eggs, maybe cats too #47344

    Errol
    Participant

    If it was me, I think I’d take the pots and their nettle plants inside if you can. You don’t want to lose the little tiddlers to wasps etc.

    Good luck.

    in reply to: fix butterfly's broken wing #47293

    Errol
    Participant

    Excellent, thanks for that Clinton.

    in reply to: Growing Swan Plants from seed #47257

    Errol
    Participant

    I too have found that it’s really difficult to transplant any of the milkweed species.

    Yet and annoyingly the ‘Blood flowers’ are spreading seeds all round the garden. No doubt into the neighbour’s gardens and elsewhere into the neighbourhood as well – and the seeds all seem to spring up and grow with vigour.

    In fact the Blood flowers have no spread so much that they have become a weed, we are having to pull them out.

    in reply to: Does cucumber work? #47192

    Errol
    Participant

    See the instar stages kindly posted by Jacqui a while ago here.Generally speaking at least 50 mm (two inches) or longer.

    Five Monarch Instars

    in reply to: Does cucumber work? #47191

    Errol
    Participant

    Well done Norm and I have to agree with you – the larvae will only survive on pumpkins, cucumbers etc when they are in their very last stages of their final instar.

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 203 total)