wintering butterflies and diapause

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  • #13051

    I have been asked alot why do some butterflies winter over and others dont:

    http://student.biology.arizona.edu/honors2002/group10/Monarchmigration.htm – this goes towards explaining it.

    Diapause is a state of stopped development of the reproductive organs, the butterfly overwinters and then starts to get sexually active in the following spring.

    there are 140 diffent milk weed species some die right back.

    in new zealand butterflies seem to be showing the behavor of the American west coast butterflies, around california by creating smaller clusters of wintering butterflies just like in New zealand and Australia.

    I have been to 8 larger sites and many smaller sites in California, nerver made it to Mexico for the mega wintering site but plant to at some point (Anyone up for a trip?).

    There is a beautiful site in beachlands, east of auckland on private land that we can arrange a trip to if others are interested one weekend in winter?

    Angie

Viewing 18 replies - 1 through 18 (of 18 total)
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  • #18036

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Also, if people see butterflies together in one spot and report it to mb.org.nz, then it would be great if they would also report if this is constant or if it changes.

    #18022

    I have 8 butterflies roosting in a conifer on the coner of my property, Hope they Stay!
    I cant get to them to tag them, they are to far up.
    Angie

    #17975

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Awesome Ladeda – can you ask anyone you know, when they see these things, to go to mb.org.nz and report what they see? Very important for our database.

    Thanks heaps.

    Jacqui

    #17933

    ladeda
    Participant

    Talking to a workmate, she said that there is one tree in Washbourne Gardens, Richmond (a suburb just south of Nelson), that has swarming monarchs. She has taken her grandchildren to see it in recent years and said the butterflies all hang from the tree.

    I shall drive out there one day with my camera!

    #17915

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Hi Ladeda, no I don’t think this has been reported before, thanks for that.

    Note my post about: Importance of reporting sightings. Would love you to post regularly about Church Hill. It would be awesome to see them arriving!

    Jacqui

    #17912

    ladeda
    Participant

    Interesting article on overwintering butterfies (sorry if this has already been posted) with a photo of the 1959 swarm of monarchs on Church Hill. Maybe this was the year that our friend remembered?

    http://tinyurl.com/6fza96

    #17834

    ladeda
    Participant

    A friend of Hubby’s dropped by – big, tough, ex-bikie – but he knows so much about monarchs! He grew up in Nelson and remembers one year when he was a kid (50yrs ago) when there were millions of monarch butterflies flocking in the street behind the Nelson Cathedral. He said there were so many that they were swarming and many just dropped out of the sky. It must’ve been a particularly good year for monarchs?

    Now I know the exact location of the over wintering butterflies, I will go for regular bike rides there and look for monarchs and any tagged ones!

    #17793

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    Margie you are quite right, butterflies emerging in the late Autumn will go into diapause and overwinter for the colder months. When spring arrives the butterfly will mate and lay it’s eggs. However they often lay their eggs late in the season, by the time the larvae develop and then pupate it is then too cold for the adult to successfully transform.

    #17792

    Swansong
    Participant

    Hey Clair Norm & Margie these are VERY interesting points you are all bringing up. This has sure got me thinking.

    Swansong

    #17789

    margie
    Participant

    I am not sure if raising the pillars inside will be having all that much affect at this time of the year as the butterflies are released into the cold air and shorter days so surely their bodies will be telling them that it is to cold to be laying eggs.
    I think it could be just a case of a warmer Autumn this year, as I had most of my chrysalis inside last year as well and they didn’t hatch and lay eggs this late.
    Just my thoughts anyway I could be wrong

    #17747

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    Diapause is brought on by two factors, reduced daylight hours and lower temperatures.
    Controlling these two factors by artificial means can bypass diapause. However one needs to look at the overall picture of the reasons to continue breeding, bearing in mind the difficulty of keeping milkweeds growing.
    Norm.

    #17746

    cadypillergirl
    Participant

    clair i dont know much about catipillars but i think u cant do any thing about it i have some and they r dovering [eating fast] my plant so let it go by cadypillergirl

    #17313

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Clair

    #17312

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I’ve been pondering the same question as wings1 over the last few days. I’ve noticed that the caterpillars I (accidentally – didn’t notice the tinies and eggs) brought home on the potted plants from the garden centres, which I have kept inside, are growing much, much faster than the pillars on my outside plant. I’ve been wondering if the pillars raised inside are being programmed to be immediately reproductive while the outside ones are being programmed for diapause. If that’s right then I’m worried that I might be raising my inside pillars for a rather doomed future. Does anyone have thought on this?
    Clair

    #17301

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Hi Maureen

    hehe. I referred to the “antennae” on caterpillars too in a post and was told that they are not antennae but tentacles! And now I’ve forgotten about the ones on the rear end, are they called the “false tentacles”. They are there to fool their predators…

    I have stayed at the site in Beachlands – but at the wrong time of year. Hope to get back there this year, will let you know!

    Jacqui

    #17297

    mrobertson
    Participant

    Enjoyed reading the link and will use the detailed drawings at school.We have been referring to the feelers on the cats as antennae but I see they are shorter and lower on the head-always something new to learn! I would love to visit Beachlands site in winter.
    Maureen

    #17179

    Can anyone let me know what affect raising monarchs inside can have on their wintering ability? If they need all the climate and plant changes do they get enough when they are inside?
    Angie

    #17158

    Swansong
    Participant

    Neat link Angie. Really interesting stuff and … SO pillars CAN SEE!!!… well not all that well but still….

    Also neat pikk of all those butterflies in a cluster…and hey theres a whole heap of those white ones in there too! WOW what a sight.

    Swansong

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