Question about my late chrysalises

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    Topic
  • #39014

    spacebug
    Participant

    I bought a swan plant at the end of Summer, planning to keep it free of caterpillars for a year and let it grow really big, then eventually give it to a young relative for a birthday or Christmas (the idea being they’ll have a plant that has grown enough to not get totally stripped as soon as the butterflies arive)

    Worked really well until recently – some caterpillars made it through my egg screening. I currently have 3 chrysalises – one looking like it might be ready to open soon, the other two only formed in the last week.

    It’s a youngster’s birthday this week, so I’m wondering if giving the plant now with three potential butterflies on it be a good idea or a bad one.

    I’m in Christchurch, so it’s cold – are they likely to die from the weather?

    Would transporting the plant be dangerous to the chrysalises?

    Thanks for feedback.

Viewing 3 replies - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
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  • #39025

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Hi Spacebug, there’s a tricky question! You can usually tell if a plant is rootbound, i.e. the pot is filled with roots and little soil, but tapping the outside. If there’s some give, i.e. it’s squeezable there’s still room for more and the soil has not been overly compacted. But if it feels like concrete, time to repot.

    Hope that helps.

    Jacqui

    #39024

    spacebug
    Participant

    Thanks. It’s currently in a tub about 20cm deep and 30 across. It seems to have grown into the tub well, and not outgrown it either. Is it likely to need a bigger tub eventually, or happy there for a good while?

    #39018

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Hello Spacebug,

    If the plant is in a pot it will make a great gift, Spacebug. The Monarchs when they emerge will surely overwinter and come back in the spring. And if the plant can be put in a larger pot (if it’s too big for the current one) and kept somewhere warmer than exposed to ALL the elements, then hopefully it should survive the winter and be a great plant for the spring.

    Wherever the plant ends up, you should protect it from the worst of the winter weather (snow, frost, wind, heavy rain) and put it in a position where it will get maximum light and sun. That depends on the location of course, but keep it on the northern side of any buildings, under eaves etc.

    Hope that helps you.

    Jacqui

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