Pesticides, herbicides etc

This topic contains 11 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Jacqui 10 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #13215

    Gilly
    Participant

    When you get your next newsletter (posted from Russell yesterday) you will read an article by Vicky on the disaster that she had this last summer with sprayed swan plants…. and now I read this on TV3-

    http://www.3news.co.nz/BannedpesticidesetforcontinueduseinNZ/tabid/420/articleID/61444/cat/59/Default.aspx

    ;

    A pesticide banned in 50 other countries looks set to have continued use here following an Environmental Risk Management Authority assessment.

    Endosulfan is widely used in vegetables, fruit, and on sports grounds to control earth worms.

    After an assessment of it, ERMA has recommended its continued use in New Zealand.

    Co-convenor of the Safe Food Campaign Alison White is not happy, she says this chemical has been linked to breast cancer and birth defects.

    If you feel strongly about this issue, as I and many others do, I urge you to go to TV3 and comment please. This is wrong and sickening. So much for the ‘clean green NZ’ :( :(

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  • #21303

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    The problem with things like this is that we don’t know for sure what harm can be done with their use. Don’t forget Coca Cola and tobacco were both touted as “health products” in their early days – and who would agree with that now. I wonder how the benefits of DDT were promoted.

    It may be hundreds of years before we realise the REAL repercussions of pesticides… if the world survives that long.

    #21302

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Terence Smithers is having problems posting – anyone else having problems?

    Anyway, he says:

    The 2 main insecticides for treating Fleas and ticks on Dogs, Cats, and other small Pets are Fipronil and imidacloprid.

    http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/Actives/fipronil.htm

    http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/Actives/imidaclo.htm

    The later is for use on smaller Dogs, Cats and Pets like Ferrets and Rabbits. I used this on my Ferrets. Imidacloprid has been tested on Painted lady Butterflies with the following results.

    http://www.entomology.umn.edu/cues/non-target/butterfly.html

    I must have exposed my Yellow admiral larvae to this over the years but they don’t seem to have suffered from this exposure.

    The only insecticide that I know from experience is safe with all but the smallest butterfly larvae is PIRIMICARB but this has now been banned in the UK due to the fact it can cause eye damage in humans.

    Terry

    #21301

    Terry
    Participant

    Hi Jacqui

    The 2 main types of spot on flea treatment for Dogs Cats and smaller animals are Fipronil for larger Pets
    http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/Actives/fipronil.htm
    And Imidacloprid for smaller Pets like Ferrets, Rabbits, Etc.
    http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/Actives/imidaclo.htm.
    I used this product on my Ferrets and even though I must have handled them and then my butterflies found no problems with it.
    I know that Imidacloprid was tested on Painted Lady larvae and was not too harmfull but Fipronil is more toxic.
    http://www.entomology.umn.edu/cues/non-target/butterfly.html
    I only know of one insecticide that I am sure is safe with butterflies and unfortunatly it has now been banned in the UK, and that was pirimicarb. I used this in my Butterfly House to destroy Aphids and it was safe on all but the smallest yellow admiral Larvae.

    #21250

    Terry
    Participant

    Hi all
    The flea (spot on) treatment contains Fipronil, see link for details on toxicity
    http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/Actives/fipronil.htm

    There is another (spot on) flea treatment for smaller animals that I used to use for my Ferrets called Imidacloprid
    http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/Actives/imidaclo.htm
    that didn’t seem to affect my Yellow Admirals when I went in to the butterfly house after handling the treated Ferrets, but that may have been good luck rather than good judgement.
    See link for results of tests of this insecticide on butterflies
    http://esa.confex.com/esa/2007/techprogram/paper_32706.htm

    #21221

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Again, more thoughts on the subject of pesticides and the risk to caterpillars.

    A friend said that a pet with a pesticide (e.g. flea treatment) on its back COULD be the reason that caterpillars nearby were dying!

    #18436

    Gilly
    Participant

    If anybody wants a copy of the petition, I have one here and can email out.

    gill@monarch.org.nz

    #18435

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    We have now submitted our petition against Endosulfan and I have put it on the website:

    https://www.monarch.org.nz/about-how-this-works/endosulfan/

    There are also petitions circulating so please look out for these in your neighbourhood, and if you agree that this is bad news for butterflies, please add your name and encourage your friends and family to do so too.

    #18359

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    About Endosulfan, Meriel Watts says:

    We need to do more than just make submissions to ERMA because they are not listening. I suggest a letter to the Min of environment asking him to call-in the decisin – he has the power to override ERMA. And get onto the media and make your voice heard.

    Meriel Watts is a long-time campaigner against pesticides.

    #18354

    Gilly
    Participant

    Alison is a green party person, I think. Too late really to give our support.. just write letters to papers… start a petition…
    let overseas countries know what is going on in our ‘green’ country…. tell the tourism industry…. tourism is already down…. explode the green myth, we might get somewhere 🙁

    #18349

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    That’s horrendous! How can we get in touch with Alison White and lend our support?

    Jacqui

    #18347

    Gilly
    Participant

    Sorry forgot to put this up: Endosulfan is a neurotoxic organochlorine insecticide of the cyclodiene family of pesticides. It is an endocrine disruptor, and it is highly acutely toxic. It is banned in the European Union, Cambodia, and several other countries, while its use is restricted in other countries, including the Philippines. It is still used extensively in many countries including the US and India. It is made by Bayer CropScience, Makhteshim-Agan, and Hindustan Insecticides Limited among others, and sold under the tradenames Thionex, Thiodan, Phaser, and Benzoepin. Because of its high toxicity and high potential for bioaccumulation and environmental contamination, a global ban on the use and manufacture of endosulfan is being considered under the Stockholm Convention.[1]

    Endosulfan is acutely neurotoxic to both insects and mammals, including humans. The US EPA classifies it as Category I: “Highly Acutely Toxic” based on a LD50 value of 30 mg/kg for female rats,[5] while the World Health Organization classifies it as Class II “Moderately Hazardous” based on a rat LD50 of 80 mg/kg.[18] It is a GABA-gated chloride channel antagonist, and a Ca2+, Mg2+ ATPase inhibitor. Both of these enzymes are involved in the transfer of nerve impulses. Symptoms of acute poisoning include include hyperactivity, tremors, convulsions, lack of coordination, staggering, difficulty breathing, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and in severe cases, unconsciousness.[7] Doses as low as 35 mg/kg have been documented to cause death in humans,[19] and many cases of sub-lethal poisoning have resulted in permanent brain damage.[7] Farm workers with chronic endosulfan exposure are at risk of rashes and skin irritation.[5]

    EPA’s acute reference dose for dietary exposure to endosulfan is 0.015 mg/kg for adults and 0.0015 mg/kg for children. For chronic dietary expsoure, the EPA references doses are 0.006 mg/(kg·day) and 0.0006 mg/(kg·day) for adults and children, respectively.[5]

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