Ophryocystis elektroscirrha or OE

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  NormTwigge 6 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #33078

    Caryl
    Participant

    I have done some research and it appears that the female monarch born today which had crumpled wings had the above disease. It was not hand reared. I found it in my garden. Is there anything I can do or spray on my milkweed plants to prevent OE?  There is a product on the Live Monarch site, a sanitizing liquid. Has anyone tried this? Details:

    The “sanitizer” is a specialized form of highly purified steam distilled water to which a titrated concentration of silver in liquid suspension has been added through electrochemical means. This nano silver colloid is 10 parts per million and has an ionic charge giving it the enhanced ability to bind with and have a toxic effect on living algae, molds, spores, fungus, virus, prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms, even in relatively low concentrations. It is photosensitive, fully active for 12 months – up to 2 years if kept in dark…In direct sun will darken over time. Less effective in darker state. For the layman: Spray lightly on everything that comes in contact with your subject. Spray on visible problems or suspected areas of contagion to saturation. Active components still active upon drying…long term antimicrobial surfaces created. Silver will not create more virulent strains of bacteria like some antibiotics. We spray our hands, cages, caterpillars, all food plants, their frasse and most of our work areas at regular intervals….used lightly as a prophylactic and heavily if problems are noticed. While nothing can protect from everything due to the mode of infection for all pathogens, we attribute at least an 80% greater recover / health rate for living creatures in our care. Our primary focus is Caterpillars with relatively simple digestive systems and little immunity defense.

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  • #33091

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    An infected butterfly can shed the spores onto the leaves of the hostplant, the spores are ingested by the caterpillar which  then starts the infection.  Some of the leaves may have escaped being contaminated by the spores so not necessarily all the caterpillars will have it.

    #33083

    Caryl
    Participant

    Thanks Norm. The butterfly died this afternoon. I am pretty sure it was OE after studying photos and looking closely at her abdomen. Does it mean that all the leaves on that plant (I don’t know which plant) will have the spores and therefore all the caterpillars on it will have the disease?

    #33082

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    Although Oe can be responsible for deformed butterflies, there are other causes also.  The product you refer to is no doubt used by butterfly farmers /breeders  using laboratory conditions to rear healthy butterflies for breeding.  It is doubtful whether such a system would work in an outside garden situation as an incoming infected butterfly mating with an Oe free butterfly will still produce Oe infected eggs, and unless you are prepared to go through the process of sterilizing all the eggs it will persist.

    All wild population of Monarchs carry the disease and is something they live with, and in nature survival of the fittest is necessary to ensure a healthy population, thus the weak die.  Trying to help every less- than- healthy butterfly may well assist it to breed and produce further less-than-healthy offspring, which nature was trying to avoid.

    #33080

    BlueSkyBee
    Participant

    Gee that’s interesting, sounds similar to colloidal silver, which I use on myself and my sons quite successfully.

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