My swan plant is wilting

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  • #14275

    Mike Hoeta
    Participant

    I just started, and I’m not sure of this situation. I had a mishap, and my swan plant is wilting, I have about 4 caterpillars on the plant and it looks like they are well aware that the plant is not good so they haven’t been feeding, they haven’t moved for ages. We had a storm the other night and I brought the whole plant inside. Any suggestions, I’m in Onerahi Whangarei.

    Cheers

    Mike

Viewing 17 replies - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
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  • #24393

    Mike Hoeta
    Participant

    Thanks for that

    #24383

    Darren
    Participant

    Honey and water is a fructose & glucose solution, which is fine. Add a drop of soy sauce for sodium and other minerals and it will be great.

    #24381

    Mike Hoeta
    Participant

    you’re not that old, (HA)I am. I never made any Jam so I don’t know, my wife did all that. I was just interested cos i do have one just about ready although my last one took ages even though it had turned dark, and I thought with the weather how it is in Whangarei at the moment I might have to hold it here inside till it fines up. So you say just honey and water is okay?

    #24380

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    What is the stuff that we used to add to jam? Wasn’t that frutcose or something?? Gosh, it’s been years since I’ve bought the jam making “kits” – don’t even know if they’re still available!

    Think the kits were made by Cerebos? But this is 25 or so years ago! It’s been about 25 years since I made jam!!

    #24376

    Mike Hoeta
    Participant

    I was just reading a recipe for artificial nectar, main ingredient fructose

    #24367

    Darren
    Participant

    Why on earth do you need fructose? It is available as a laboratory chemical if you really need it. Otherwise it is a large portion of an invert sugar such as honey. chemically speaking glucose + fructose = sucrose (aka cane sugar)

    #24365

    Mike Hoeta
    Participant

    As a matter of interest, my friend who has the 3 large plants, interesting to note not one single cat or egg on them, lots of aphids though.hmmm.

    #24364

    Mike Hoeta
    Participant

    Where on earth would I get Fructose from

    #24363

    Mike Hoeta
    Participant

    Thanks for that, I’m not sure if she will let me dig it out cos it’s right next to her roses and is overpowering them. That’s why she wants it moved, if they have a shallow root system, it may be ok. I will certainly prune it and bucket the prunings. She’s actually got 3 quite large plants, so I’ll have too many prunings to handle I would say.
    As for the cuttings I put in water in response to Jennifer’s advice, they did perk up but I lost one cat in the water and I’m down to 4 but except for one, they’re not very active I’m afraid. I sprayed the cuttings with a fine misty spray from a squeeze bottle too, that seems to have helped as well.
    I have one butterfly ready to hatch, if the fact that he’s turned very dark is any indication. I have him inside on a potted plant but I haven’t hatched one inside before, shall I take him outside or what?

    #24358

    Jennifer
    Participant

    Mike – To transplant your friends plant – they are very shallow rooted and can easily be dug up, but as Jacqui says it best after prunning – easier to manage, wont blow over or need staking etc. At this rate you will have enough cut stems to feed an army of caterpillars!

    #24347

    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Mike,

    I agree with Jacqui, but will add in that you need to get as much of the roots as possible.

    Robert.

    #24343

    Darren
    Participant

    My neighbour cut a giant swan plant off at ground level 2 months ago. I was very disappointed but I see it is sending out new leaves already. I’ve taking to sticking all my prunings in the ground just in case they strike roots.

    #24338

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Mike – my suggestion would be to prune that large plant hard back. Smash the bottom of the stems of the prunings (so they can absorb water) and put them in a bucket. You now have a pruned bush to try transplanting plus you’ve got a bucket/bush of food to feed the caterpillars on. Some of these will grow a root system and you can plant them out too when the caterpillars have had their fill, they will resprout.

    Good value, eh?

    Jacqui

    #24335

    Kirby
    Participant

    They seem remarkably resilient plants- I don’t know about the transplanting, but you could try what Jennifer suggested if it turns out to be too big and unmanageable?
    I had a stem about 12 inches long that I cut from the top of one of my plants, to wrangle a foolish caterpillar with.
    I popped it in a cup of water, and it now has a system of roots.

    #24332

    Mike Hoeta
    Participant

    Another thing A friend of mine has a big plant that she doesn’t want because it’s growing over other plants in her garden and she says she’s going to chop it down. Is there any way I can transfer it to my garden without it dying
    Cheers
    Mike?

    #24331

    Mike Hoeta
    Participant

    Thanks for that I’ll do it right now.
    Mike

    #24329

    Jennifer
    Participant

    Could you try cutting off one stem and sticking it in water to see if it revives. If so, you can put several stems in a vase and have the caterpillars feeding on the cut stems. They last perfectly fine in water, will resprout and have even been known to root in water. You are right the caterpillars dont usually like wilted stems.

Viewing 17 replies - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)

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