Monarchs and medication

This topic contains 1 reply, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Jennifer 4 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #42229

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Just like us, the monarch butterfly sometimes gets sick thanks to a nasty parasite. But biologist Jaap de Roode noticed something interesting about the butterflies he was studying — infected female butterflies would choose to lay their eggs on a specific kind of plant that helped their offspring avoid getting sick. How do they know to choose this plant? Think of it as “the other butterfly effect” — which could teach us to find new medicines for the treatment of human disease.

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    Jennifer
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    Well that is very interesting. I have noticed 2 things. Monarchs in general in my garden prefer swan plant to incarnata for egg laying. They have no prefernce for either species for nectar. Is swan plant one of the toxic species?

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