Looking ahead

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  • #14728

    Jean Stanley
    Participant

    Is there anything I can do once the monarchs finish to prevent

    my bushes being attacked by aphids next season. Once stripped of leaves I prune back and fertilise. As much as I dislike spray I feel I should be spraying at that stage.

    Ideas appreciated.

    Jean Stanley

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  • #26836

    Darren
    Participant

    Jean I have started a new thread for ladybird houses. Feel free to add anything you discover to it.

    #26832

    Anna
    Participant

    You may find german wasps come along and eat a lot of them, or we are lucky enough to get a lot of silvereye birds who just seem to love any aphis they can find.
    Another thing you can do instead of using spray is to squirt the bushes hard with the hose, and over several days. Works every time…and by doing it over a few days you get any stragglers.

    #26829

    Jean Stanley
    Participant

    Sadly I still have masses of aphids on the bushes I have not as yet pruned but even the pruned ones show aphids on the bare branches. Ladybirds are quite rare in this area, seldom seen so how can I improve that situation. Having just installed a weta house on our public walking track do please tell me more about ladybird houses. I need to climb this learning curve(:-) thank you Darren.

    #26826

    Darren
    Participant

    Aphids are defenceless little creatures, so their survival strategy is simply to breed like mad. The winged form is also highly mobile. So once you have pruned back and fertilised I don’t think there is much more you can do for those plants. I suspect you will have got rid of any aphids present, and I don’t think a poison spray in winter is going to deter them next summer.

    To prepare for next season start encouraging ladybirds and other beneficial creatures. Build ladybird houses, plant companion plants to attract the good bugs, and fertilise as healthy plants can withstand attacks better than weak ones.

    There are foliar sprays such as the one produced by ocean organics. I have been reading about “aerated compost tea” which sounds promising and I’m planning to trial that next year.
    http://www.ehow.com/how_5222720_make-actively-aerated-compost-tea.html

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