Fallen

This topic contains 8 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Rebecca 8 years, 7 months ago.

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  • #13300

    rosemjuliet
    Participant

    Hi

    I have been through the site and read of the many ways in which to glue or tie a fallen chrysalis ad have tried this. But I have a fallen J shape caterpillar and there is nothing to tie it back up with. Will it form a chrysalis lying on its side that I can then glue up or is it a lost cause?

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  • #25946

    Rebecca
    Participant

    That’s interesting about the chrysalises that are not hanging and how the butterflies climbed up. I suppose they would have the instinct to hang on something. I recently had a butterfly that had just hatched and I saw it crawling along the concrete it’s wings still not stretched out. I realized that it had fallen from it’s a chrysalis which was up high but still in a sheltered position – perhaps it was knocked by a strong gust of wind? I put it back into a place where it could stretch out it’s wings but they were permanently crinkled everytime I checked it. I left it outside for the day and when I went out in the evening it had gone – perhaps it’s wings streched out eventually or it got eaten by something or it crawled away somewhere else.

    #25943

    Darren
    Participant

    I have always been very careful about glueing them onto a stick using a cool melt glue gun. But a couple of weeks ago I got a call from someone to say their large plant had been stripped. I rescued about eighty odd large caterpillars. We also found some fallen chrysalises, so I popped them into a castle to keep them safe temporarily while I got busy with the caterpillars. I was astonished the next morning to find five butterflies hanging from the ceiling of the castle. They must have managed to eclose on the floor of the castle and then climb up the sides unaided.

    #25932

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Swansong used to be amazing at this, hooking them back into the silk that a caterpillar had previously used. There are instructions in here somewhere – also google Edith Smith and “cremaster” (that’s the black stem) on the internet. Iknow she’s got very explicit instructions somewhere.

    #25930

    LouisaGr
    Participant

    I have had fallen chrysalises and have used bluetack to put around the little black piece they stick to the white bit with and have been able to hang them with that. but that is after the J wonder if the bluetack would work as above to hold them to, to make that added bit of web they make to reattach themselves while still in the J

    #25925

    Rebecca
    Participant

    I had a situation last night where a caterpillar forming a chrysalis got knocked from it’s white sticky dot to the ground.

    You see, we live near the river and have ducks that visit our house, they are cute although quite annoying. I think they just come up for food in summer. Anyway – sometimes they eat roaming caterpillars and others forming chrysalises low down like on the sides of pots. This caterpillar from last night was on the side of a pot and they did not eat, simply knocked it. It was lying in a ball on the concrete but still alive.

    I had no idea what to do, it had been making it’s j for about a day … I could remember reading somewhere on here that they can re-attach themselves. So, I gave it a try holding into a J shape and placing it where it’s white dot was. I did this for about 10 mintues which was hard as I had to be very still – for a while nothing happened and I didn’t think it would work. However, after a few minutes more – some clear sticky stuff came of it – it was like glue and turned into the white stuff we normally see. It re-attached successfully! I was so pleased. It is a chrysalis now! It seemed to know just what to do with a little help. I just hope it is ok after it’s trauma from the ducks 🙂

    #18805

    Swansong
    Participant

    Are the chrysalis’ just lying down in the chamber B4 hatching? Id like to see some statistics to know whether the odds are the same for success this way as apposed to naturally hanging how they were designed to do. Certainly Ive seen some successes but Ive seen failures too, even when hey did have something to climb on to.

    Swansong

    #18801

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    I have now read that a chrysalis (once formed and hardened) doesn’t need to be hanging to emerge properly. The emerging butterfly just needs something rough to climb up, and enough room to expand its wings fully.

    Here’s a photo of MonarchWatch’s emergence chamber:

    http://www.monarchwatch.org/temp/emergence_chamber.jpg

    #18712

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Hi there

    Well, whatever you try can’t possibly do any harm – this one may not survive but you will learn from the experience. You need to watch it like a hawk…

    When a caterpillar usually changes from a caterpillar to a chrysalis, it starts to split open at the bottom of the J. Just before it does this you will notice the tentacles (at the head end) go very limp you will know it’s very close. At that point the caterpillar has to shed its skin completely, and usually where it is attached to the branch or wahtever it “lets go” completely for a split second to get the ring of crumpled skin away from the pupa.

    I would suggest that you have some toothpicks or tweezers or something very handy in case you see where you need to help. It might be of assistance, when it is going throught the process of losing its skin, to turn it over a few times, to make sure that the wet pupa-to-be (which is actually the inside of the caterpillar) does not stick to the surface on which you ahve it. Perhaps if it is on a table or bench, if you could put it on something with very fine serrations or soft bristles… like velvet – just a thought.

    Do let us know how you get on, please.

    Jacqui

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