Bug to be aware of!

This topic contains 10 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  susan 5 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #37365

    susan
    Participant
    #37364

    susan
    Participant

    Thanks Jacqui for that information. Having had a closer look at the beastie in question I’ve decided that it isn’t the brown soldier bug. I went and looked on the Landcare Research site that you gave in the latest course notes and was able to identify my bug as one that eats the seeds of milkweed species. That would explain why, in a previous summer, I can remember seeing lots of them in old opened seed pods. I’m planning to collect seed for the MBNZT this year so they won’t get a look in!

    #37251

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Hi Susan

    I suggest you remove as many of those bugs as you can as soon as you can. I’m not sure if anyone knows just what they eat – there is no money in saving caterpillars so probably no-one has done any research on it. Therefore best to remove them from your swan plants as soon as you can.

    If anyone does know the answer to Susan’s question… please share!

    Jacqui

    #37250

    susan
    Participant

    Hi,
    I have found a few brown soldier bugs on some of our swan plants. At the moment the plants are having eggs laid on them by a new crop of butterflies that recently hatched. No caterpillars as yet. Will the bugs predate small caterpillars or do they prefer the larger ones? Should I try and remove them before they become a problem and increase in number? Three or four summers ago we had very few caterpillars on our grove of swan plants – I now remember seeing large numbers of these bugs, mostly hiding in opened seed pods. By the way, I’m really enjoying the Butterfly habitat course, and guess my questions may be answered in next week’s topic!

    #24539

    judi
    Participant

    and thanks Jacqui for posting the photos – the 3rd one I have is of the caterpillar dangling in mid air, attached only by the ‘skewer’.
    Oh, another new sight for me – a couple of years ago – a butterfly laying eggs on a frangipani – why?
    so many questions…
    judi 🙂

    #24538

    judi
    Participant

    Hi Char
    would love to catch up, now that I get a life after the summer obsession on monarch watch! – altho youll have to be prepared for an excited rave, when I talk about them! we can rave together, Im sure I can learn lots from you.
    judi 🙂

    #24536

    Darren
    Participant

    Beautiful photos of Cermatulus nasalis, also known as the Predatory Shield Bug or Glossy Shield Bug.

    It’s Hort page is here:
    http://www.hortnet.co.nz/key/keys/info/enemies/lba-enem/lbapred9.htm

    Gibbs (1994) describes it:
    “A flat brown soldier bug (Cermatulus nasalis) has been noted to have an appetite for monarch larvae. This 10mm long bug looks like a small version of the common green vegetable bug, except that it is dark brown with a yellow crescent mark on its back, between the wings. It feeds by spearing the larva on its long hollow beak and sucking out its contents. The soldier bug is found in Australia and New Zealand.”

    #24534

    Charlotte
    Participant

    Welcome Judi to the forum and the MBNZT.

    I am also out West and still have caterpillars and chrysalis around. Its been a long year for Al & I we have been going since Oct 09;-).
    Hope we can catch up soon over a coffee perhaps Judi?

    Cheers
    Char

    #24531

    Jacqui
    Moderator
    #24529

    judi
    Participant

    HI Jacqui
    as you suggested 4 weeks ago, have sent my ‘beetle’ pics to you..
    It was amazing to watch..it’s size in comparison & the tricky manoevres. how long ago those sunny days seem!
    (I’m West Auckland) and still have some 20 cats, even more pupae, & butterflies still arriving, tho quite a few casualties in the cold. They rest for days..need pots of flowers to rest them on til that sunny warm day..& to perfect the nectar procedure…

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