Aphid overload and poor breeding season

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #57783

    hugo
    Participant

    A mild winter (Tauranga area) has contributed to a major explosion in oleander aphids on my swan plants and on many at Te Puna Quarry. Despite regular removal attempts they have succeeded in proliferating to almost plague proportion. With a large number o swan plants it takes a great deal o time just dealing with some of the plants which means re-infestation occurs very quickly. It has also been compounded by a very slow monarch breeding season meaning far more leaves on the plants.

    There have been virtually no eggs or cats over the past 2 months which does mean squishing and spaying with a dishwashing solution can be done without impacting on monarch breeding. In the past week there has been a sudden surge in honey dew production leaving the swan plants all sticky. Normally by this stage o the year the swan plants would be covered in cats rather than aphids

    It would be good to hear i other people are having bigger issues with aphids this year. I would be good to get feedback about how the monarch breeding season is going to date.

Viewing 2 replies - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #57790

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Great piece last night on SEVEN SHARP about Aphidius colemani – good bugs getting bad bugs. Did you see it?

    What to do when an infestation of bugs is killing your favourite garden plant

    What to do when an infestation of bugs is killing your favourite garden plant. Turns out the best way to fight bugs may be with other bugs.

    Posted by Seven Sharp on Sunday, November 24, 2019

    #57784

    LeslieD
    Participant

    Every year is so different. Last year I started the breeding season with some of my own winter overs, this year none of the few eggs I got were any good. This has happened before in the high suburbs of Wellington, where its cooler and windier than the lower areas. I had more aphids last year but not seen too many so far this year. I do have caterpillars now , they are immigrants from a low Wellington suburb. The advantage of the slow start for butterflies here is the slow start for other insects, so not plagued by predators too much yet. Any change in weather seems to have an impact on everything.

Viewing 2 replies - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.