A female Lesser Wanderer butterfly was caught

This topic contains 192 replies, has 12 voices, and was last updated by  clinton9 4 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #15108

    clinton9
    Participant

    Today,

    I caught the female Lesser Wanderer butterfly in wasteland near Thames Refuse Transfer Station this afternoon.

    This late morning I were hunting for aussie butterflies and I went to retirement building by Richmond Rd and looked for butterflies, but no aussie butterflies.

    Then I went to wasteland by Refuse Transfer Station and looked for aussie butterflies, but I saw a red admiral butterfly and I went after it so I can get it to lay eggs on my potted nettle, but I lost it as it flew away north-westward toward sea. Then I biked eastward and when I stopped biking by a bench, to check for Aussie butterflies and suddenly I saw a Lesser Wanderer butterfly flying from dump, then I went after it, and swinged my $ 2 net at it…missed…it flew fast for 11 metres…then it dropped onto a long dead grass stalk…I swinged the net across the grass & caught the Lesser Wanderer butterfly.

    When I handled it carefully, I found tip of hind body were damaged…#@@# how little careless I were, as I was hoped to send eggs to Zac (nzwings), but only if butterfly is willing to lay eggs. Otherwise Zac have to accept a gift from me in form of a damaged butterfly. If it won’t lay eggs in few days time, I have to kill it and send the butterfly to Zac.

    The Lesser Wanderer butterfly is alive and in my smaller caterpillar castle with orange-flowered milkweed (swan plant).

Viewing 25 replies - 126 through 150 (of 192 total)
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  • #29776

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    How fantastic, Clinton. Norm will be in touch by email.

    #29764

    clinton9
    Participant

    Hi Norm,
    Today this late morning I caught a young male Lesser Wanderer butterfly and it is alive….do you want this ????

    It will provide new bloodline for your Lesser Wanderer butterflies.

    Clinton.

    #29757

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    Apart from Tasmania and Victoria the Lesser Wanderer (Danaus petilia) in Australia breeds throughout the year so given a similar latitude the only likelihood of it breeding anywhere in New Zealand would be the far Northland. However if it is continuous brooded in Australia that means photoperiod or daylight hours are not too critical for the cycle so I would hope that given the right temperatures it should continue to breed in captivity, just as the Yellow Admiral can do.
    Were it able to survive in New Zealand without assistance it could well be considered native, which would be exciting.
    After all the Long Tailed Blue (Lampides boeticus), another Australian butterfly, established itself here in the late 1960’s.

    #29745

    milkweed
    Participant

    I remember reading that a self-introduced insect/animal becomes categorised as ‘native’ and not ‘exotic’ as long as man did not deliberately assist the migration/introduction. So, therefore the Monarch and the Wanderer butterflies are now native to New Zealand!! Haha. Am I right in my assertion?

    #29739

    Jane
    Participant

    Very pretty little butterflies I had the honour of looking after for a while:-

    Lesser wanderer pics

    #29728

    milkweed
    Participant

    These are very exciting developments Norm. I just hope they can survive a winter in your butterfly house and then breed prolifically next Spring/summer. I wonder what their tolerences are for cold temperatures outdoors? Could they realistically survive a winter outdoors somewhere in the north of New Zealand?

    #29726

    Jane
    Participant

    I think Lesser Wanderers are extremely smart….fancy two of them finding you Norm. They are very smart indeed and show very good judgement! This is very good news. Good luck with them Norm.

    #29721

    Bernie
    Participant

    I’m struggling with the ones I got from London Pupae Supplies and another lousy weather day has not helped.When I was in Africa,in the Gambia,two years ago, there was a beautiful sub species of chrysippus with white hind wings.I brought 3 cats back but they turned out to be all females!

    #29720

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Fantastic, Norm. That is great news. Quite a difference in size. Very exciting stuff. I’m keeping my fingers crossed for you.

    #29719

    Charlotte
    Participant

    Wow Norm you really have been lucky:-) So happy for you. You must be on cloud nine?
    Glad to hear the butterflies have paired up for you..

    We have been seeing a few small Monarchs of late around.
    At West Lynn there was a tiny male pairing with a large female.. Poor boy could not carry her..

    #29717

    Zac
    Participant

    wow seriously?…it probably is most likely to be a sister from the same batch laid elsewhere, but you just never know..we had a huge storm recently and that could have brought another wanderer. it would be a good idea to use that female and mark her for potential new bloodline, its worth it. well im sure your on to a winner norm;) the wanderer clinton sent me the same day you caught your first female was actually the same size as a small red admiral, and i remember looking at it thinking “that’s pathetic! i thought they were bigger then that”. well it shows you they can come in slightly small sizes and larger too

    #29716

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    Now I would not blame anyone for thinking I was telling ‘porkys’ but mid-day today I caught a second Lesser Wanderer in my back yard, which I transferred to my butterfly house. It was an extremely small female, the size of a Red Admiral, which ruled it out as being an escapee from my b/house as those are all a uniform size. My deduction is that it was probably from an egg laid by the original butterfly, in the surrounding neighbourhood, making it a sister to the ones in my b/house. If not, and it is not related then even better as it will provide fresh bloodstock to the breeeding. Today I noted 4 pairs connected, the first pairings I have observed so the females were code marked on their wings so I can track their egg laying. Also of note is the wing marking showing the difference between male and female, the male being the bottom one.
    Size difference here:

    Lesser Wanderer

    #29691

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    Very exciting, Norm. I believe that the LW had a lot of attention at the Ellerslie Show today. (I was there late.)

    #29687

    Anna
    Participant

    Norm, that sounds great…lets hope they are fertile. One of the 14 males hopefully got lucky!

    #29671

    Charlotte
    Participant

    I will cross everything for you Norm and hope that you have managed to start a second generation.. I know if anyone can YOU can Norm:-)))

    #29669

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    The scales have evened and with now 30 Lesser Wanderer butterflies emerged the score is – females 16, males 14.
    Today one of the earlier emerged females began laying eggs, although I had not seen any pairing, but I should know within
    5 or 6 days if they are fertile. If so this will be the second generation, and I am optimistically confident with fingers crossed.

    #29649

    Zac
    Participant

    that’s great norm, interestingly your getting more females emerge then males. as it is usually more males are abundant then females, allows the less females to not be caught to provide the next generation. i notice this with species such as dodonidia helmsi where most of the specimens in museum collections are mostly wild caught males.

    #29648

    Bernie
    Participant

    It will be interesting to compare how they react on opposite sides of the globe Norm.Yesterday my friend Don brought the pupae round that he purchased from London Pupae Supplies.Today in GB it’s a dull day,so the ones that have emerged have not moved yet.I am keeping them in the conservatory in a cage,so hopefully when the sun shines and I have fed them,I will get pairings(barring sod’s law occuring!)

    #29645

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    Update on the Lesser Wanderers – nine butterflies emerged today which now totals ten, six females and four males, and with others colouring up there should be more due out tomorrow. Not too hopeful of any mating tomorrow with the weather forecast, so I will wait patiently for some sun.
    Pupation period is running at 12 – 14 days.

    #29611

    Anna
    Participant

    Thats great…I’ve had a lot of monarch butterflies eclose today, and the weather is rather grim, so I will put them out with the Admirals till the weather clears up.

    #29610

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    There is no documentation that I am aware of indicating Oe in chrysippus (Lesser Wanderer) species. Having said that I have one pupa with symptoms very much like Oe.
    My understanding is that Oe only affects Monarch and Queen butterflies.

    #29608

    Jacqui
    Moderator

    You’re right Kate – only milkweed butterflies (Danaus species).

    #29606

    Pepetuna
    Participant

    What I’ve read suggests OE is not a disease but a parasite that affects danaids (milkweed eaters) and there are no other known hosts:

    “OE was first discovered infecting monarch and queen butterflies in Florida in the late 1960s. There are no known other hosts. It has since been found in all other monarch populations world-wide. Because of this world-wide range, all indications are that this parasite has coevolved with monarchs.” [sorry have lost the reference for this, so can’t give you the source]

    I think that means that whereas it might affect Norm’s Lesser Wanderers, it won’t affect our Admirals.

    #29605

    Anna
    Participant

    Can OE affect all butterflies, or just monarchs?
    (I have been wondering that when I mix admirals with monarchs in the same environment)

    #29604

    NormTwigge
    Participant

    A few of the larvae did not make it through, 2 hanging in ‘J’ failed to transform, and so far one pupa had discoloured. But that still leaves 52 pupae to eclose so that is plenty to go. Also still quite a few lavae yet to pupate so my hopes are high.

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