Barry

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  • in reply to: Spare Swan Plant Seeds Anyone? #56887

    Barry
    Participant

    Hi Caryl.
    See my address ay http://www.pycroft.co.nz.
    else barry@pycroft.co.nz
    Barry P.

    in reply to: Spare Swan Plant Seeds Anyone? #56867

    Barry
    Participant

    Caryl.
    Do you enough seeds form your project?
    I have lots of each of the four (4) varies – all mixed being the Gomphocarpus physocarpus with Gomphocarpus fruticosus and CURASSAVICA
    Scarlet Milkweed or, Tropical Milkweed, Silky Gold. I also have some silky separately identified.+
    I have some a month in the fridge, and another batch just gone in . Maturity & germination NOT guaranteed!

    Barry P. Christchurch.

    in reply to: Buddleja varieties #53727

    Barry
    Participant

    Thank you Matt.
    The link is most helpful – being NZ-Aus knowledge point.

    I guess it is the B. salviifolia that I have. Again, Thank you.
    I must somehow organize my brain to know this info!!
    I Have the Globosa to come out later, an the Summer Lilac later.

    Regards. Barry P.

    in reply to: BAG Moth – Christchurch #52471

    Barry
    Participant

    T.E.R.R.A.I.N. = Taranaki Educational Resource: Research, Analysis and Information Network
    This got left out of my last message. Sorry Rob.
    Barry P.

    in reply to: BAG Moth – Christchurch #52470

    Barry
    Participant

    Rob, Hi.
    Your answer lies well in GOOGLE. I cannot explain the animal so well.
    I first learned of these as “Case Moth” as a child, – my Uncle used to make trout lures from the old cases. I have hours of videos of these climbing up the kitchen windows. The view underneath – between the caterpillar and the surface it is crawling on, is not a frequent image.

    This site is a wonderful site for describing all manner of Flora & Fauna in New Zealand.
    Enjoy. Barry P.

    in reply to: Cleopus japonicus on Buddleia #50614

    Barry
    Participant

    It is Christchurch, now middle of May – Cold but clear.
    The evidence of Weevil is in on my ‘new’ buddleia. I did not have a problem on my davidii (‘Summer lilac’) until I planted a Buddleja globosa (Buddleja × weyeriana ‘Sungold’ )?) and a white ‘Morning Mist’.
    I am not sure how soon the North island distribution was intended make its presence felt here, but it seems I have the weevil the city now.
    Barry P. Christchurch.

    in reply to: nettles #49273

    Barry
    Participant

    Flutterby.
    Ph 0223140100 and get some from me at Shirley.
    Barry P.

    in reply to: nettles #49108

    Barry
    Participant

    Great going. Flutterby.
    My first crop of nettles is now past, and I have not yet seen any Admiral Cats, despite settling butterflies here in Shirley.
    Barry P..

    in reply to: nettles #49084

    Barry
    Participant

    Thank you, Norm
    One of my observations is that there are no caterpillars after a couple of weeks, so my conclusion was no eggs laid, or eggs died early..
    Perhaps it was parents scouting the location for homes for future children?
    Hmmmm!

    in reply to: nettles #49080

    Barry
    Participant

    Sorry Richard, No.
    Despite seeing many admirals settling on my nettles, I have not seen any eggs.
    I have some really large, succulent nettles, but no animal life.
    {BEP}.

    in reply to: nettles #49021

    Barry
    Participant

    Michelle, Hi.
    . . Urtica Urens, our familiar ‘farm-yard’ weed is a prolific seeder but has a short life of only 120 days or so. I have spring germinations that are maturing now and will be gone by Christmas. The seeds get everywhere and three mature crops in NZ are typical. They will survive the winter but not grow (in Christchurch) but any of autumn’s seeds will germinate as soon as possible in the spring. The nettle will flourish in many soil types and environmental conditions of sun, shade, damp, dry etc. with appropriate life & maturing states.
    You will need 3 or 4 pots (or more) seeded or planted monthly in order to assure a continuing fresh supply of nettles. They grow quite profusely big & bushy in warm moist soil.

    Nettles grow straggly & unsightly, strong & woody in order to disperse their seeds. As Admiral cats do not have a sense for tomorrow’s meals, the nettles will suffer even more.
    As for being in pots, nettles have a massive ability to grab at the soil and the more fibrous, composty the better. I think they have tap-root style but enjoy old lawn clippings. My healthiest, most vigorous nettles are in old lawn clippings spread on garden soil. For pots, fibrous compost with equal parts of regular soil and that’s it, for nettles. When most vigorous, nettles transpire a lot of water, so drying out in pots will not enhance their butterfly value.
    Pots for the nettles sounds like a good for being able to protect easily the Admiral cats against birds and wasps.
    Barry P. Christchurch.

    in reply to: nettles #49020

    Barry
    Participant

    Michelle, hi.
    The nettle (our ‘farm yard’ type) will flourish in many soil types and environmental conditions of sun, shade, damp, dry etc. with appropriate life & maturing states.
    You will need 3 or 4 pots (or more) seeded or planted monthly in order to assure a continuing fresh supply of nettles.
    Barry P.

    in reply to: WASP and Yellow Admiral #48902

    Barry
    Participant

    For the pupa, maggots, caterpillars and captive insects, boiling water (vey hot out of tap) works well. Same as for garden weeds!!

    Would pyrethrum spays (Fly spay) be acceptable? Especially inside a butterfly castle or other limited volume? What is the hold back time on Fly spay?
    {BEP}.

    in reply to: nettles #48410

    Barry
    Participant

    I suspect that Britain’s U. Dioica are not as attention grabbing as our U. Urens. I have photos of a garden carpet. The plant is super highly prolific and gets everywhere. And as our city folk in general do not have to live with the weed as do the rural folk. Schools & child-care centres, Public parks & waterways, are places where it is undesirable for them to appear since our urban education ignores this aspect of understanding our ecology. See < http://www.eattheweeds.com/urtica-chamaedryoides-nettle-knowledge-2/ > “” From the nutrition point of view, they pack a wallop as well. Stinging Nettles are rich in vitamins A, C, D, iron, potassium, manganese, and calcium. They are also high in protein and when cooked are very mild, tasting similar to spinach but slightly rougher.”” Also see < http://www.wildhealthfood.com/the-benefits-of-eating-nettles >. I suspect this is why horse poo is a natural nursery for nettles – horses eat it for its nutrients!
    Barry P.

    in reply to: nettles #48403

    Barry
    Participant

    G’day Terry.
    I noticed while I was in England last May-June the stinging nettle everywhere. Tall, stout, robust, massed weed, but seemingly inoffensive. I took several photos to help me identify the ‘Dioica’ species. In UK, that plant is ‘common’ in real terms.
    I was fascinated by the amount I saw when in the Cotswalds. (Coaley Peak).
    Cheers, Barry P.

    in reply to: nettles #48402

    Barry
    Participant

    Hi Richard.
    I have replied to your e-mail about Urtica Urens …
    {BEP}.

    in reply to: nettles #48365

    Barry
    Participant

    I think Admirals will find your patch without the need to add some eggs, though I would like to see some Reds among my Yellows.

    Apparently, Vanessa winter over as both caterpillars & butterflies. So I am watching carefully my small collection of cats now that winter is extending a frosty hand. I have eyes on about 10 chrysalises, so Spring will be interesting for me if the wasps haven’t had their fill by now.

    The tiny wasps just love newly forming pupa.

    Cheers {BEP}.

    in reply to: nettles #48364

    Barry
    Participant

    You might scout you district for horse ‘farms’ or stables etc. Many farms have nettles around the animal & implement sheds. Stable cleanings are a great manure / nutrient for nettles.
    I can send you a ‘heap’ in a plastic bag if you like. They grow really easily – too easily!! Just cut some mature stems from the plants and ‘flick’ them around your patch.

    You will need a sequence of plantations as the nettles – of the domestic weed variety – grow & mature quickly and one can easily have 3 or 4 ‘crops’ in our season. Which means you could have a spent crop without food for any caterpillars! Then of course the Vanessa I. devour the plants as if at McDonalds’ <Hi hi. grin!> So a progression of plants is needed. Pots & planters with seedlings in a greenhouse every three weeks or so will help with that. Along with natural cycle of course. Gloves help with handling & overalls help minimise unwanted seed dispersion. They are not called ‘stinging’ for nothing!! Young plants are more easily handled however.

    Make sure the unwanted nettles are ‘weeded’ when young as Mr Yealands will not appreciate those among his vines. Nettle seeds are prolific and grow wherever they find soil. I have a photograph of my patch here when it would make my lawn look sick for lusciousness!

    I have found that a frame / wall or fence of wind-cloth will help contain wild seeding and help stop the birds from feasting on the Vanessa spp. caterpillars.

    e-Mail barry@pycroft.co.nz (+03-942.8417) for a package of nettle seeds.
    Cheers Barry P. (Christchurch).

    in reply to: Yellow Admiral pupa time #48207

    Barry
    Participant

    Thanks, Norm
    I can’t say that I have not seen any wasps, except for some small ‘flies?’ on the cat as it pupates. May 2016 in Christchurch has not been a month of wasp sightings. A few Honey bees and the odd Bumble B.
    I know one particular pupa I filmed forming and it is ‘distorted’. The others are all brown. Do you mean ‘Rusty’ as in reddish?
    I am not sure I can inspect a chrysalis that closely without causing some disturbance to its ‘state’ or condition. A couple are in the middle of a nettle patch, but I do not wish to change their environment. I’m not sure I want to protect the patch even if it snows. Perhaps frost-cloth … {BEP Chch.}.

    in reply to: Yellow Admiral pupa time #48205

    Barry
    Participant

    Hi Wendy.
    I missed your point that it is Cats you have, not pupa.

    My advice is to keep fresh nettles up to them. As long as they are feeding and warm, they should mature. When timing is another factor of course not in our control.
    As I said in my prior post, there is not a lot of specific data – all generalised for favourable conditions. One commentary indicated the Vanessa Itea winter over as either Caterpillars or Butterflies. So here in Christchurch, with its currently warm late Autumn May I will be watching closely as I still have cats and pupa. I have a small patch of large nettles in the middle of my vege garden. So I just need to watch what the natural outcomes are.
    Cheers. Barry P.

    in reply to: Yellow Admiral pupa time #48204

    Barry
    Participant

    Hi Wendy.
    There is not much else one can do while the chrysalis exists.
    It is probably worth noting daily high & low temperatures and count the days till the butterfly emerges.
    There is not a lot of specific data – all generalised for favourable conditions.
    One commentary indicated the Vanessa Itea winter over as either Caterpillars or Butterflies. There was no mention of the overwinter state of the pupa. So here in Christchurch, with its currently warm late Autumn May, I have more pupa now than during the summer, just as you say. They are in just wherever place they want to be – Five in shelter in a Caterpillar castle, in the middle of the garden on a nettle, five hanging on the western side of the garage. I will simply note the ‘Nature’ of them.

    You do not tell of your location, but you do say ‘survive the winter’, so how far south are you? Do not fret about their survival – they either will or will not as their individual circumstance has determined. You have a good range of environment, so noting the temperature & daylight is most relevant. Such creatures have a natural instinct for survival so the idea of husbandry is probably more of negative than positive influence on overall numbers while a few might benefit from human intervention.

    I have had monarchs emerging this week – the middle of Christchurch May!

    Cheers. Barry P.

    in reply to: 3D printing SWANS #48114

    Barry
    Participant

    Take some good examples of seed pods (swans), Spray them with clear lacquer/ polyurethane (two or three light coats) and the preservation process should be effective for your needs.
    Barry P. Christchurch.

    in reply to: Butterfly netting #48113

    Barry
    Participant

    There are various grades of wind cloth, Frost cloth, available on bolts / rolls.
    There are metal tripods & poly pods frames for plant/ flower constraining & climbing. Pantyhose & similar or the cloths above could be wrapped over that.
    The Caterpillar castles are good – in three sizes.
    Barry P. in Christchurch.


    Barry
    Participant

    What a nice vision you write of your place.
    You have much better plant growing climate than here in the rocky/rolly city.
    The biggest problem you have is not enough Asclepias spp. (Swan plants)!!
    That is a big grin.

    I have just learned about some of the varieties of Buddleia and I purchased a couple when the MBNZT came to Christchurch. I now have one of those Yellow globe (Buddleja globosa) varieties. Typically we have the “”summer lilac” version – (Buddleja davidii) -or the long lilac coloured flower. Anyway, these bushes / shrubs appear to be the top of the list of the butterfly & insect feeder flowers. ‘Why’ is a good question.

    Keep the wasps off the caterpillars.. They won’t worry the Monarch butterflies though. If you have a lot of wasps – Is been their season – perhaps an observation of activity might locate a nest. I had a nest in my roof in January. The exterminator dealt to that.
    Meanwhile, enjoy the observing the devouring ability of the cats as they grow.

    My son had a caterpillar come inside his house and make a chrysalis under a kitchen chair!! That was spooky when it emerged indoors from under the chair!
    A newly emerged butterfly, when extends and dried after a an hour or few, can be handled quite comfortably, tho gently. Let it walk all over your hand, arm or whatever. It will fly off when it is dry enough and (light & strong enough).
    Jacqui has given you good description of there new emergence.

    Regards, Barry P.


    Barry
    Participant

    2nd part – – – The caterpillars will go to wherever their energy takes them. I am intrigued by what criteria – Temperature, humidity, Daylight, Hormones, pH, Gene maturity, energy (sugar / fat content) or whatever – causes the cat to stop travelling and pupate. Some will form on the host plant, some might travel 15 or more metres away and climb 2.5 metres up a tree, vine, a nearby plant, such as buddleia, tomato or silverbeet. Ultimately, they are not fussy. They might mill around for a few days before they settle to hang in a [ J ].
    In a caterpillar castle, they will congregate on the top / roof of the enclosure.
    But that’s my observation and conclusion. {BEP}.

Viewing 25 replies - 1 through 25 (of 41 total)