What is this Red-Orange Thin Waspy Insect

This topic contains 13 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  NormTwigge 5 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #54862

    FiLeBeau
    Participant

    Just went out to water when a red-orange thin waspy insect flew toward my hand on the hose. It was dark as Id been out – and it seemed to be a nocturnal hunter.
    Is it a wasp? A native? Any ideas would be welcome.
    Thanks – Fiona

Viewing 13 replies - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #54997

    NormTwigge
    Keymaster

    It is almost impossible to identify an insect based on a brief description, so if possible the best way is to take a photograph, include it with the post to the forum, and it will usually be identified by someone. Most people these days carry a cell phone, so a photo should not be too difficult. The correct ID saves people killing off a native insect that may or may not be threatening a non-native such as a monarch caterpillar. Our native praying mantis appears to be on the decline, being displaced by the South African mantis. While I will quickly dispose of a S.A. mantis in my butterfly house or on a swan plant, I prefer to relocate the native variety, for while they may consume the odd monarch caterpillar, they also help to eradicate other pests such as flies, wasps, White butterfly caterpillars etc.

    The “Red-Orange Thin Waspy insect” may possibly have been a golden hunter wasp, which paralyses spiders and places them on its eggs in cells, ready to provide fresh food for the soon to hatch grubs. So they are not a threat to caterpillars. A quotation from a scientist is worth considering – ” Who gives a person the right to decide what animal lives and what dies”.

    #54995

    LeslieD
    Moderator

    Terry I agree with you wholeheartedly on just about everything … but I don’t agree with calling a group of people fools. All groups of people have their share of alternative ideas and thoughts which we don’t have to agree with, but we need to respect their right to hold those views. Its ok to challenge the ideas but not attack or demean the person.
    Anyway this is getting way off topic! I think we can learn lots from your experiences with butterflies 🙂

    #54990

    Terry
    Moderator

    I am an amateur entomologist not a professional paid one. No one would fund my project as what the world system we live under funds is only research that benefits the economy in some way not wildlife. This is why the most common mistake made by people is to think they have managed a victory over any government when they get protection under law for a species. This is a huge joke played on the people by any government in the world because it’s never the particular species that needs protection but it’s habitat that it needs to thrive in. Be it insects or mammals protection of a species won’t save it from extinction only laws to protect it’s habitat. Classic example is the Marsh fritillary in the UK. It has full protection under the law so you cannot collect it, breed it in captivity etc. However what was seen as a victory for the greens is devastating for the species in reality because it’s habitat required is very precise and not protected under law, therefore the government can destroy it’s last remaining strongholds when ever it wants but those who used to breed it in captivity (and it is very easy to breed massive numbers) are now outside the law. Just one example of green thinking against sound science. Sound science would have informed the fools that push for protection of species it won’t work. Example 2 Tigers in India! protected. Habitat not protected! Humans encroach on Tigers territory and when humans get attacked by Tigers, Tigers are killed. Not rocket science just plain common sense really. Governments exist to create wealth and are all run by vested interests who are also very wealthy therefore will only pass laws that continue the system. People mock Trump and in many cases rightly so, but what he said about climate change had lots of truth in it. In the past money to stop climate change was given by rich countries to poor ones to do certain things in this regard, and the corrupt leaders put the money in Swiss bank accounts. And does anyone really believe that under a democracy people will vote to lower their own living standards. People always vote for the party who promises more personal wealth not less.

    #54939

    LeslieD
    Moderator

    thanks Terry, yes I’ve seen some reports.. gosh a 21 year project is quite something! True, few people here will be involved with butterflies, or any insect to that extent. I am just an enthusiast with a keen interest in the environment, so probably a ‘greeny’. I see butterflies as lovely things that bring joy but I’m keenly aware of the importance of insects in our changing environment. I don’t see why there should be a clear divide of science and amateur interest. In my view one should complement the other for the greater benefit. thanks again 🙂 Leslie

    #54931

    Terry
    Moderator

    Thanks Leslie, As I live in the UK I suppose I have got used to asking questions from a more scientific standpoint. As for politeness I had no idea how defensive some people can get when challenged on why or how about a subject. I am used to ukbutterflies forum and similar. My interest in New Zealand butterflies stem from 21 years of line breeding Vanessa itea to learn as much as possible about them in comparison to our vanessa atalanta as you probably already know! This is the sort of conversation on that site in link below.

    http://www.ukbutterflies.co.uk/phpBB/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=9984&sid=90021cc3fe720eec3c0b5a9326c5a594

    As you can see because we have more species and a larger population of humans and Lepidopterists the conversations are a bit more in depth. That’s not a dig at New Zealand it’s just with 67 million people compared to your tiny population we tend to have more interest and may I be so bold as to say “serious interest” in Butterflies, so people who are, can I again suggest “greenies” tend to have there own web space. I think the Guy who runs the NZbutterflies site is more of our persuasion having had his background in the UK and has carried that over with him to New Zealand. I know of a few other New Zealanders who are lepidopterists in the truest sense and they tend to take the more scientific line over emotional interest. I should have known better as I still remember a few years ago the totally unscientific fallout/reaction to Clinton when he stated he had set a few dead butterflies So apologies! Didn’t mean to offend but I obviously hit the sensitive spot!

    #54903

    LeslieD
    Moderator

    Agreed Terry you are certainly not in the PC camp 🙂 but I do think its important to be polite when expressing your views or run the risk of stopping useful debate/learning experience. I do agree with the gist of your comment and I’d like to add a link to NZ parasitic wasps https://teara.govt.nz/en/wasps-and-bees/page-2 it may help. what Fiona described is almost certainly what we get round here in Karori (Welly) and it is definitely a parasitic wasp. I’ve seen them dragging extremely large paralised victims off to have eggs laid in them. One parasitic wasp has been introduced to NZ to control white butterfly and I doubt they give a damn if its white or other. So, I’ve caught a couple of the type Fiona has seen in my hothouse when I have had monarch cats and I felt justified in dispatching them, just as I feel justified calling the exterminator to get rid of the wasp nest I just discovered up the hill on our property. I don’t think any of us like to kill without justification but sometimes its a matter of a critter in the wrong place and its a choice of self or them. cheers 🙂

    #54901

    Terry
    Moderator

    Paper wasps are a foreign introduced species and a known pest species I have no problem with killing them although it will make little difference due to the very high numbers of that species. I also have no problem with killing known parasites of different stages of Butterfly life cycle. however my question was really about killing something on the wild guess it may kill Butterfly Larvae. If it cannot be proven that its a danger you could be killing a useful species. It’s not just Butterflies that get attacked, and as most insects whether predatory or parasites are “host specific” it is best to identify first then kill if necessary. I still cannot see the link between Martial Arts and what I am talking about, and as for Political correctness I am it’s greatest enemy. Maybe you get scientific people mixed up with bunny hugging emotional people of which I am the former not the latter.

    #54895

    amyellis529
    Participant

    Paper wasp maybe?
    I’ve had to kill two this year as they have attacked my cats. Only ever seems to be one lone one flying around at a time fortunately.

    #54894

    FiLeBeau
    Participant

    –Typo corrected. Apologies–
    I will protect in my sanctuary the Butterfly and Moth who have no teeth, no claws, no sting. There are plenty of slugs, flies, ants, spiders and earwings for those who predate to feast on. I dont think any of these are endangered by the way.
    They are welcome to live in my open garden but I have a No Fly/Crawl/Creep Zone for predators in the Butterfly zones.
    I have a limit. That may not suit other people but thats mine. It may not be politically correct in some/many members view but I stand for the Butterflies on this call.
    Due to the worst actions of human nature, “Nature” is out of balance. I throw my support behind the defenceless. I studied martial arts for many years I have no qualms about defending those who cant defend themselves.
    Thank you for your perspective and sharing it. It’s great that we can have differing views yet work cooperatively for the nectar drinkers in our neighbourhoods.
    Aroha
    Fiona

    #54892

    FiLeBeau
    Participant

    I will protect in my sanctuary the Butterfly and Moth who have no teeth, no claws, no sting. There are plenty of slugs, flies, ants, spiders and earwings for those who predate to feast on. I dont think any of these are endangered by the way.
    They are welcome to live in my open garden but I have a No Fly/Crawl/Creep Zone for predators in the Butterfly zones.
    I have a limit. That may not suit other people but thats mine. It may not be politically correct in some/many members view but I stand for the Butterflies on this call.
    Due to the worst actions of human nature, “Nature” is out of balance. I throw my support behind the defenceless. I studied martial arts for many years I have no qualms about defending those who cant defend themselves.
    Thank you for your persepctive and sharing it. It’s great that we can have differing views yet work cooperatively for the nectar drinkers in our neighbourhoods.
    Aroha
    Fiona

    #54887

    Terry
    Moderator

    So you kill an insect, and you don’t really know it’s true identity, don’t know it’s classification name or much of anything else and you choose to squash them. So what is your reaction to people who kill Butterflies out of pure ignorance? I thought Monarch Trust was about educating the public to respect wildlife in general! Predators have a place in nature as well you realise and encouraging others to kill without proper understanding is stupid and a bad advertisement for Monarch Trust!

    #54875

    FiLeBeau
    Participant

    Well it’s now on my Hit List.
    I must say I was surprised to see it flying in the dark…
    Thank you Leslie

    #54863

    LeslieD
    Moderator

    if its what I’m thinking its a predator. I’ve seen them dragging paralysed bodies of quite large insects and spiders away to lay their eggs in them. I hate the damned things and never miss an opportunity to squash em.

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