Wasp Traps

This topic contains 15 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Charlotte 6 years, 11 months ago.

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    Topic
  • #14549

    Leslie
    Participant

    I found a new ? product yesterday in Palmers Bethlehem. Called Soda Bottle WASP TRAP .

    It basically gives you plastic inserts to put onto plastic drinks bottles so wasps are enticed in but cant get out. For $5.99 it looks well worth a go !

Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #30615

    Charlotte
    Participant

    Thanks for your tip PatriciaBramw we will give your tip a go this season:-)

    #30611

    PatriciaBramwell
    Participant

    Just read your post & thought this tip would be useful for you.
    I bought a wasp trap from our local Palmers store last year. Instructions are to fill 1/4 (or less) with sweet fruit juice, & place piece of meat or fish in this. the trick is to leave it to ferment (In sunshine should be a week or so). There will be no wasps around it until the fermentation of meat starts! Trust me, I had 2 traps going all summer and wasps were pretty much dealt with. Highly recommend that you try this.

    #25850

    Leslie
    Participant

    Yes well I dont really think we need photographic evidence of that story ! Thanks for all the relevant information Darren ! and Norm and Terry as well ~ the topic is so crucial to our butterfly husbandry . My new wasp trap looks fabulous. But since installing it Ive only seen one wasp in my garden and despite changing the liquid after a couple of days , theres nothing caught. I m wondering if it isnt a visual deterrent as well , but will keep you all posted on the efficacy soon as Ive caught something !! and i will definitely try to never sit on a wasp.

    #25848

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Ouch! Photos please!!

    #25846

    Darren
    Participant

    Polistes chinensis have quite a nasty sting as well. Just before Christmas I was sitting on a wooden deck filling little plant pots with potting mix. I leant over to reach a pot at the back and as I returned to vertical I inadvertently sat on one!

    Initially I thought I had sat on a splinter, and felt the wasp as I grabbed at the affected area. The pain started about two minutes later and I spent a lot of the day sitting on an icepack. Most of the pain had gone by the next day, but then the itching started, and continued for another 3 days.

    #25844

    Terry
    Moderator

    Are the nests of Polistes chinensis really easy to find and if they are, are they easy to kill with some of the over the counter wasp killing products? I have read that when they first appeared the NZ Government tried to control them, did they give up or do they still try to keep them in check? As you now have 4 species of wasp to contend with, they must become quite a menace to people in the autumn period like our UK wasps do, the cold weather makes them a bit nasty and more prone to sting before the winter proper kicks in and they disappear.

    #25843

    NormTwigge
    Keymaster

    The Asian paper wasp Polistes chinensis causes huge losses to admiral caterpillars where they are unprotected. A Farm paddock I visit during summer has numerous clumps of Urtica dioica (nettle) growing, and the red and yellow admirals lay eggs on it by the hundreds. And as the population of caterpillars build up, so do the wasps, and they have a field day feeding on the caterpillars. Visits to the area several weeks later revealed very few caterpillars and large numbers of wasps patrolling the plants. Birds love the admiral caterpillars, and praying mantids and shield bugs also take their toll. Those caterpillars that are lucky enough to get to final instar and pupate are then at risk of being infected by the parasitic wasp Echthromorpha intricatoria.
    Last year I let visiting yellow admiral butterflies lay their eggs on nettles in my veg. garden and observed their growth. From approximately four dozen young caterpillars only 5 or 6 made it through to final pupation stage.
    So anyone living in an Asian paper wasp frequented district that intends to grow nettles and raise some admiral caterpillars, make sure the nettles are covered, or better still raise them in a suitable cage or container, or you will be just feeding the wasps, birds and other predators. MBNZT has excellent rearing castles available, designed for that very purpose.

    #25841

    Terry
    Moderator

    Hi Darren

    I just read the article and looked up the wasps on google images, I think they are the nests I saw, but I thought some were a bit bigger than golf ball size, the biggest looked more tennis ball size, but I took no photo’s so it’s all from memory, I was just so surprised when I stood on this cattle grid outside of a farm entrance and saw all these nests suspended underneath. I cannot remember what the wasps looked like as it was late evening and I don’t think they were very active, and after all these years I could well be wrong! I saw them in the North Island somewhere near Mangawhai, not right on the coast but inland. It’s a shame they cause so much damage to butterflies in general but helpful when it comes to eating Small White (Pieris rapae)larvae.

    #25837

    Darren
    Participant

    Sadly New Zealand has some of the highest densities of social wasps in the world. In beech forest with honeydew, the biomass of social wasps (about 1100 g/ha/yr) is greater than that of all the native birds.

    The Asian Paper Wasp was found in Auckland in 1979. I’m not sure exactly how it got here. Attempts to eradicate the wasp failed as it was already too well established. It has since spread throughout the North Island and to the top of the South Island. From my observations I would say it is easily now the most common wasp in suburban Tauranga. When I first saw one about six years ago I was puzzled by its dangly legs and slow flight along my fence. Now I see the darn things everywhere. Their favourite food is caterpillars. Mostly Pieris rapae according to research, but there is always at least one wasp patrolling my swan plants every time I check. The nests are small, like a golf ball, so those were probably what you saw in the 1990’s Terry if you were up in the North.

    Good reference here
    Distribution and abundance of the Asian paper wasp Polistes chinensis antennalis Perez and the Australian paper wasp P. humilis (Fab.) (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) in New Zealand
    BK Clapperton; JAV Tilley; RJ Pierce
    New Zealand Journal of Zoology, 1996, Vol. 23: 19-25
    http://www.royalsociety.org.nz/publications/journals/nzjz/1996/092/

    #25836

    Terry
    Moderator

    Hi Darren

    Polistes Chinensis, thats a bad one! when exactly did it arrive and do they know how?
    On my visit in the early 1990s I noticed that there was a species of wasp that made lots of small nests hanging under cattle grids, any idea which species this was? I must admit at the time I did not venture to ask anyone, but I did notice many more wasps around than we get in the UK so I can understand why they cause you so many problems in NZ. You New Zealanders are very unlucky when it comes to being invaded by hostile alien plants, animals and insects and have more than your fair share of them!

    #25828

    Darren
    Participant

    Hi Terry, you might not be aware that as well as Vespula vulgaris we have recently been invaded by Polistes chinensis, aka the asian paper wasp.

    Polistes chinensis workers can lay eggs, although these are often destroyed by the queen and the other workers.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_paper_wasp

    #25827

    Darren
    Participant

    The detergent or soap reduces the surface tension.

    Basically bits of water are attracted to other bits of water. The bits at the top have no water above them to be attracted to so they form an extra attraction to the bits around them. This effectively creates a ‘skin’ on the top of the water that is strong enough for many small creatures to walk on. The detergent stops the formation of that skin, so the small creatures sink and drown.

    #25823

    Leslie
    Participant

    The product ( made in NZ ) recommends sugary fruit water in the bottle and the insert has a wee spike on the outside to add a piece of raw meat. Also says add a drop of mild dish soap to the fruit mix …not sure whats thats for, maybe to make it all slippery ??
    So for anyone interested , their email address is tollesbury@xtra.co.nz Tel 09 4764429

    #22748

    Terry
    Moderator

    Hi Jacqui

    All wasps don’t have the ability to breed!
    Each wasp colony includes one queen and a number of sterile workers. Colonies usually last only one year, with all but the queen dying at the onset of winter. New queens and males (drones) are produced towards the end of the summer, and after mating, the queen overwinters in a hole or other sheltered location, sometimes in buildings. Wasp nests are not reused from one year to the next, however, in the mild climate of New Zealand and Australia, a few of the colonies may survive the winter, although this is much more common with the German wasp.
    Quoted from Wikipedia, if anyone wants more info link, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vespula_vulgaris

    #25821

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Great, Leslie – can you let us know how you get on with it?

    Is the bait protein or nectar?

    The wasps only eat caterpillars when they’re searching for protein, i.e. feeding their young. But having said that, all adult wasps have the ability to breed and perpetuate the problem.

    Jacqui

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