Predator help

This topic contains 13 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Darren 6 years, 4 months ago.

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #31535

    jules
    Participant

    With total horror last evening I discovered some bug sucking the life out of my biggest baby 🙁

    It kind of looks like the link included. I quickly tried to capture and remove it but lost it. Same has happened this evening and once again I missed it. I have also just removed and relocated a giant praying mantis. Just to keep things interesting in the past few days loads of yellow aphids have moved in to the new tip growth of my plants, it is really hard to remove them by hand as the new hatchlings are also in the tips. Groan 🙁

    any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

    http://springfieldmn.blogspot.co.nz/2011/09/harlequin-bug.html

Viewing 13 replies - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #31589

    Darren
    Participant

    I thought most weevils were herbivores, and generally have quite a ‘snouty’ sort of look?

    Whereas shield bugs are recognisable by their distinctive five part shape that gives them their name Pentatomidae.

    #31575

    jules
    Participant

    thanks for that. I am trying to catch one and keep it alive, but they are really quick when you go after them. Someone else via facebook has suggested it could also be some type of weevil ? I just wish there weren’t so many of them 🙁

    #31573

    Darren
    Participant

    I did an image search for pentatomidae nymphs http://tinyurl.com/cfkmws2

    Say’s stink bug (Chlorochroa sayi) looks kind of similar? Good pictures of the nymphs and adults halfway down this page
    http://waynesword.palomar.edu/anzabugs1.htm

    #31571

    Darren
    Participant

    They look like nymphs of some species of predatory stink bug. It might be easier to identify the exact species if you can keep some alive to adulthood and document the various stages, for example: http://flic.kr/p/4yfCZr

    You could also try the Enviromental Health Officer at your council 06 835 7579

    #31570

    jules
    Participant

    Got him !!

    http://tinyurl.com/crwme8g

    So many more being killed over night. I am bringing the larger ones in doors and now feeding them on pumpkin and fresh milkweed leaves. they seam happy with both. Fingers crossed

     

     

    #31565

    jules
    Participant

    we are in Napier

    #31564

    jules
    Participant

    thanks Jacqui, I am a bit of a nature photographer and have never seen them till this year when we planted the swan plants and attracted the Monarchs.My partner has never seen them before either. I will try capture another and pin it flat so as to get a petter pic.

     

    forgot about tinyurl lol

    #31563

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Hi Jules

    I don’t know that one at all. Whereabouts are you? It might be as well to get someone to take some better photos of the bug as personally I’ve never seen this one before – not in Auckland nor had someone report it as a problem.

    Not to be alarmist, but if it has something that has recently arrived in New Zealand (and it does happen) it could also be a problem to other flora and fauna, so you might like to submit some more photos.

    By the way, your links to photobucket were a tad long and wouldn’t work so I’ve taken the liberty of putting in alternative links.

    Hope that’s helpful and that you can get to the bottom of this.

    Jacqui

    #31562

    jules
    Participant

    Here are the nasty little suckers. We have killed over a dozen of them in the past day or so as they are decimating the population.I know it is natural predation, but it is really heart breaking seeing so many sad dead carcases on the swan plants. Hopefully we are making the odds a little more even.

    The darker image is the same bug, just a little damp 🙂

     

    [IMG]http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y28/marzrox/public%20links/IMGP9754_zps8394d7ba.jpg[/IMG]

    http://tinyurl.com/d22xnp2

    [IMG]http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y28/marzrox/public%20links/IMGP9765_zpsc7f35edd.jpg[/IMG]

    http://tinyurl.com/bw7hzgu

    #31542

    jules
    Participant

    The closest thing I can find to it is the soldier assassin bug or variant of the stink bug maybe.

    I have a couple of mesh cake covers, I think I might just take a small back up plant I have in a pot and bring some indoors safely. I notice this morning very few of them are eating, they are lethargic but alive. Might be time to rescue the healthier looking ones and hope for the best. So sad, I have made a photographic study of them so far from a Monarch laying through to their hatching and development. You do get pretty attached to them once you become informed 🙁

    Thanks for your input. I will perhaps try remove the aphids with he spray from one of the plants and see how that goes. All going well I will move on to the others. Don’t want any more casualties.

    #31541

    SallyM
    Participant

    Hi Jules, your bug may be a juvenile Shield / Green Vegetable bug.  Bad pic here but shows adult and young – http://greenharvest.com.au/PestControlOrganic/Information/GreenVegetableBugControl.html)

    #31540

    Pepetuna
    Keymaster

    Hi Jules. I agree with Jacqui, keeping my caterpillars in castles is the only way I can keep them from being taken by predators such as praying mantises, wasps, and spiders.

    As far as controlling the yellow aphids goes, I have tried a few things, and I find a soap-based product works, and it is non-toxic to the caterpillars. It is a Yates “Nature’s Way” product called Insect & Mite Spray and you can buy it in garden centres. I found this to be effective, whereas the spray I made myself from Sunlight soap wasn’t.

    #31537

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Aaahh! I feel for you, Jules.

    Could it be this one, the assassin bug?

    Assassin Bug

    Or another version which eats small larvae – assassin bug

    http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/resources/identification/animals/bug-id/alphabetic-list-of-bugs/assassin-bug

    Or you could search for it here:

    http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/resources/identification/animals/bug-id/what-is-this-bug

    Jules, you may not want to hear this, but here it is…

    This is entirely natural. There aren’t meant to be millions of Monarchs and no wasps, bugs or other predators/parasites. A female Monarch lays hundreds of eggs, on average 300, and some are destined to be food for other animals. That is Nature in action, or ecology, or whatever label you want to put on it.

    However, that being said, it doesn’t help you – and it can be expensive buying lots of swan plants to feed caterpillars in the hope that you’ll be raising beautiful butterflies – just to find that some other “interloper” has eaten them.

    There are several things you can do and I’m sure some of our other members will add to the thread. I have a small greenhouse outdoors into which I put swan plants and small caterpillars – eggs sometimes too – and hopefully exclude insects like ants, earwigs, wasps, praying mantises. It’s not perfect – but at least I have more success. It certainly doesn’t exclude the diseases that could also affect the Monarchs.

    Another thing I use (when it suits me) is my caterpillar castle, cutting stems of milkweed (swan plant), macerating the bottom of the cut stem (so they can absorb water) and standing the stems in vases of water inside the caterpillar castle.

    Caterpillar Castles

    My caterpillar castle will then be left in the sunniest room of the house – perfect conditions – and hopefully keeps the caterpillars munching away safely throughout their metamorphosis, and then I can release the butterflies.

    As I cut stems off the milkweed bush, the plant continues to grow, and the caterpillars tend to eat the leaves and stems with less waste.

    Hopefully those ideas will help you.

     

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