Moth Vine Beetle

This topic contains 8 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  LeslieD 2 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #56291

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Do you oppose the proposed introduction of the moth plant beetle (APP203667), to control a nasty weed, but which MIGHT also affect our swan plants?

    The authorities have tested the beetle on various species and this is what they have to say about its effect on Tweedia:

    Tweedia

    ” Tweedia is a potential field host to the beetle and could support populations (of the milkweed beetle). There are no other species in the same subtribe in NZ…

    “…it is likely that the beetle would attack tweedia, however,
    such attacks would be incidental or spill-over effects where moth plant and tweedia grow in close proximity to each other. Tweedia is not a big earner for nurseries and garden centres and the potential risk posed to tweedia is acceptable when considered in the context of moth plant’s adverse effects on natural environments and biodiversity values.”

    No-one can be certain that if this beetle is allowed into the country, it won’t affect our swan plants or other milkweed. You have until this Friday (15 March, 5pm) to make a submission. Please take action NOW!!! Please share this information to anyone who loves monarch butterflies – they need to be involved in the decision-making.

    https://epa.govt.nz/public-consultations/open-consultations/moth-plant-bca/

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  • #56923

    LeslieD
    Moderator

    just got this … well lets hope its not our very own environmental blunder like oz’s canetoad debacle.

    Dear Submitter,

    The EPA has made a decision on application APP203667 to release the moth plant beetle Freudeita cf cupripennis as a biocontrol agent for moth plant, Araujia hortorum. This application followed the Notified pathway and was an application to import for release a new organism under section 34 of the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996.

    Relevant documents as well as the decision can be found on our website: https://www.epa.govt.nz/database-search/hsno-application-register/view/APP203667 under the ‘Documents’ tab.

    Please contact the New Organisms team (neworganisms@epa.govt.nz) if you wish to discuss this decision or any aspect of the decision making process.

    Yours sincerely
    Diane Totton, on behalf of Aubanie Raynal

    #56655

    LeslieD
    Moderator

    https://www.epa.govt.nz/assets/FileAPI/hsno-ar/APP203667/3f1dc9387d/APP203667-EPA-Staff-Assessment.pdf

    sorry you are right, I got an email which directed me to above and I didn’t read the entire email (blush). So that’s good news I guess but sounds like it will take something fairly substantial to shift their view of no risk.

    #56652

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Hi Leslie

    Where did you hear that? According to the website:

    Hearing

    After evaluating and reviewing the written submissions, we consider that a hearing is necessary to determine this application.

    The hearing will be held at Area Conference Centre, 1 O’Reily Avenue, Wellington, on 1 May 2019, starting at 10 am. Members of the public are welcome to attend.

    #56649

    LeslieD
    Moderator

    looks like its been approved for release … lets hope the little ******s stay focused on mothweed and don’t adapt.

    #56410

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    So are these the main types of swanplant that we grow here? Sorry i’m a bit dim on the subject lol.

    Yes.

    My initial reaction to the documents and testing regime is testing is too limited and lacks information on how adaptive these beetles are .. what do they do ‘if’ they scoff the mothplant and need something else?

    That’s more or less what we said too. You can see our submission here.

    #56319

    LeslieD
    Moderator

    I see some testing has happened on two forms of swan plant, gomphocarpus fructicosus and ascelpias curassavica (tropical). So are these the main types of swanplant that we grow here? Sorry i’m a bit dim on the subject lol. My initial reaction to the documents and testing regime is testing is too limited and lacks information on how adaptive these beetles are .. what do they do ‘if’ they scoff the mothplant and need something else?

    #56301

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Regarding Cleopus japonicus, my buddleias are making a comeback this season – the beetle doesn’t seem to be having much impact.

    Regarding buddleias – which garden centre is selling them – and which one are they selling? Probably not B. davidii. The others aren’t recognised as a pest species.

    #56293

    kay2
    Participant

    I dont know what is going on in this country. First they import cleopus Japonicus to kill all the buddleia, cannot grow it here now as it just gets desimated. Then I see it being sold back in Mitre 10 in this area again and the plant people dont know anything about that. What is the point of selling it if it will not survive? Now they are looking to import moth plant beetle to kill the moth vine and possibly tweedia and possibly swan plants?

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