Aggregating Monarchs

This topic contains 13 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Jacqui 8 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #24737

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    I was fit too! Much fitter than I am now. (sigh). I actually used four horses: Rosy was left to become a matronly retired brood mare south of Christchurch – had one foal. Doug the packhorse, D’Art and Captain (the 2nd packhorse, when Doug hurt his back) all lived happily in retirement here in Russell until D’Art died a couple of winters ago. Doug and Captain still enjoy each other’s company, gazing out over beautiful views here. I don’t ride them any more – or I should say I haven’t. They do get light exercise when kids come to the farm and they ride and swim them.

    Maybe I’ll get riding again in the future, I’ve not decided.

    #24736

    Jennifer
    Participant

    I bet the horse was fit afterwards. How many horse shoes did you go through?

    #24699

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Nine and a half months. But it was only about 100 days in the saddle. I started in April (April Fools Day?) in Blenheim and got as far as Amberley when I realised my horse was not the most suited to the task. So I left her in Canterbury and bought another one, and started again in Bluff with a friend, Lisa. She left me about Oamaru. I got as far as Amberley again, started again in Wellington and rode up. Met some fantastic people along the way – often they would “twist my arm” into staying a little bit longer, especially if there was a storm or it was snowing etc, or if they had interesting things to do like herding in the cattle from “out the back”.

    It all feels like a bit of a dream now. I have put my “diary” on my website, http://www.bitbybit.co.nz, but that was really rough. I’ve written a better version but never got it published. Maybe one day…

    #24697

    Jennifer
    Participant

    Talk about intrepid, what a wonderful thing to do. How long did it take you?

    #24624

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Not sure if 77 metres sounds tall or not! ROFL. I read it in a tourist book when I was planning my ride – the length of New Zealand. Started at Blenheim, rode to Amberley, then Bluff back to Amberley, then Wellington to Cape Reinga. About 15 years ago. It was fantastic. Unfortunately, all I’ve recorded in my diary is:

    “It was dark before we arrived at a tourist park, Orokonui, which is set in a valley at Waitati surrounded by conservation areas and reserve. Fifteen kilometres north of Dunedin, it’s set in delightful grounds, with farm animals standing in tall trees – in fact NZ’s tallest tree can be found here.”

    #24623

    Jennifer
    Participant

    The tallest tree at Orokanui is a Eucalyptus regnans in a stand. It was recently measured at 77 metres. I think the information about an overwintering site there was probably false. Next rumour is that there is one in the Catlins! Pehaps we should send out a search party!

    Why were you riding a horse through Orokanui Jacqui?

    #24590

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Report just in of 400-500 Monarchs at Abberley Park, quote: “On a tree that is growing on the edge of a creek about 25 meters West of the community hall.”

    #24540

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Photos from Kath Widdowson

    Nelson overwintering clusters

    #24449

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Rode my horse through Orokonui, in fact, I think I stayed there overnight. If I remember rightly, the tallest trees in NZ are/were there, but can’t remember what they were – kahikatea maybe?

    Would be great to hear if there is an overwintering site there, haven’t heard of this one before.

    J.

    #24445

    Jennifer
    Participant

    Thanks Jaqui. I am starting to get info on possible overwintering here. One person says there is one at Orakanui and is sending me stuff in the post. I will let you know more as soon as I have a slightly more precise location!!

    #24430

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Hello bump. 🙂
    Sorry I overlooked your post a few days ago. It looks like pohutukawa and I searched on Nelson and found the posting of the sighting – where they say “pohutukawa and red oak”. I don’t know red oak myself, but pohutukawa is a common enough tree that they overwinter in.

    Nelson / Atawhai / 2010-05-17 13:45:00

    Dr Barrie Frost who is a Kiwi based in Canada and does research on migration and how animals navigate suspects that they leave behind a pheromone in the trees, and that’s how they know where to go, and it’s more likely that resinous leaves such as pohutukawa and conifers will retain the pheromone from season to season. (I hope I’ve explained that well.)

    #24423

    Jennifer
    Participant

    bump

    #24328

    Jennifer
    Participant

    What is the plant Jacqui?

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