A. curassavica and aphids

This topic contains 7 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Pepetuna 5 years, 6 months ago.

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #15265

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    To reduce the risk of aphid attacks on A. curassavica, someone suggests minimal watering and watering only at ground level.

Viewing 7 replies - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #30372

    Pepetuna
    Keymaster

    There has been a post on another forum I subscribe to, that says sprays with the active ingredient pirimicarb kill aphids only and not the caterpillars. In fact he has sprayed the plants with serious aphid infestation even while the larvae are on the plants. In New Zealand this ingredient is in a product called Aphidex. I haven’t used it, but thought others might have tried it. Anyone?

    #30135

    NormTwigge
    Keymaster

    I grow A.curassavica (bloodflower), G.fruiticosis (swanplant) and G. physocarpus (giant swanplant) and like Jacqui my A.curassavica gets the worst infestation. This year I did nothing to try and eradicate them and the stems were thick with them, but the caterpillars did not seem to mind. Then the ladybirds moved in and almost within a week the aphids slowly disappeared. When I think of all the squishing and hosing down I did last season and was probably killing off the ladybirds as well.

    #30132

    Pepetuna
    Keymaster

    Here in the humid Waikato I usually see an absolute infestation of yellow aphids on my Gomphocarpus. This year hardly any. In fact I’ve seen them on one plant only. Don’t know why that is. I haven’t changed irrigation method. There are none at all on the Asclepias curassavica, but this is the first year I have grown them.

    #30131

    Jane
    Participant

    Thats true Jacqui that rain wets the leaves rather than just the root zone, but depending on how often a gardener has to irrigate, and some do so often, this can keep the leaves wet for a much higher percentage of the time, thus allowing the ideal conditions for fungal spores to sporalate (germinate) and diseases like powdery mildew, downy mildew, black spot, rusts etc.

    Interesting that you get many aphids on your A.curassavica …perhaps it’s the climatic/geographic difference between the areas or something. I’ve very rarely seen aphids on those here. I wonder what others experiences are on this?

    #30128

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    The reverse here, if I want to see aphids, I can usually find them first on A. curassavica! I will have to try adding water just at ground level though… but what about when it rains? Can’t train the rain to do that!

    #30125

    Jane
    Participant

    Actually I forgot to mention. Funnily enough – the A. curassavica don’t seem to get aphids as much in my garden as the other milkweeds! Interested to hear what others have noticed.

    #30124

    Jane
    Participant

    I have found that A. curassavica grows better here in areas that don’t dry out as much, and the plants withstand our soggy boggy semi-aquatic winter months in puggy clay. This variety seems to tolerate wet areas better that the G. physo., and G. frut., that seem to thrive in the dry. I’d be interested to hear what ‘milkweed’ has to say on this topic because he/she knows far more about the milkweeds than I do.

    In most plants it is advisable to apply water to the root zone. Some plants like water on their leaves, but in MOST cases water to the leaves encourages fungi and disease infestations.

Viewing 7 replies - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.