Fallen Chrysalis… does it matter if…

This topic contains 12 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  snoopdogg 1 year, 2 months ago.

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  • #31965

    notsotypicalblonde
    Participant

    Hi, I have just found a fallen chrysalis on plant bottom, the silk remains and a small segment of the leaf stem.  Leaf was eaten a while ago, not sure if another pillar ate thru remaining stem or it just fell.  Anyway I used some clear cotton stuff I had and tied the remaining stem to the main plant stalk.

     

    However the chrysalis  is now at more of a 45 degree angle as opposed to hanging straight down (like they do naturally).  Will this matter????

    (It has room to stretch and pump up  its wings though)

     

    thanks in advance

    Katrina :)

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  • #32101

    snoopdogg
    Participant

    they fall down all the time cause the lazy ones dont do it off the plant.if it is not damaged tape it to a fence post ,it does have to be hanging normally but ive saved many this way.on the plant is not a good idea cause if ya got to many hungry ones they eat most of the leave and it hangs on by bugger all

    #32084

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Further thoughts.

    If you mean “how can something that it can climb up when it comes out” work, I once noticed a flash of orange in a bush in my garden and realised it was a crumpled Monarch climbing upwards. On the ground nearby was the pupal case.

    Making the transformation from caterpillar to chrysalis is one of the most “dangerous” episodes in a butterfly’s life, and also the emergence process. But even when that fails there’s a chance that the butterfly can make it if it is close to something it can climb up.

    I hope that explains it – if not, please clarify.

    Cheers

    Jacqui

    #32081

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    I’m sorry, Caryl. Maybe I’m having a senior moment, but I’ve read your post out loud for I don’t know how many times and I can’t understand what you’re asking! I’ll look at it later, again.

    How can WHAT work?

    Hopefully, someone a bit brighter than me can answer – or someone may clarify it for me.

    Thanks.

    #32076

    Caryl
    Participant

    Jacqui,
    when the butterfly is born the wings are crumpled and they don’t climb immediately so how can it work?

    Caryl

    #32075

    Caryl
    Participant

    Katrina, Thanks for replying. I appreciate that very much.
    Some chrysalis don’t survive and it upsets me too. It took 77 days for mine to mature from egg to butterfly (the first generation) and I hastened their birth by putting a heater on in the room they were in. If your chrysalis is soft thenit won’t become a butterfly. I am saddened that their success rate is so low but I do my darnest to get the rate up from 5% in the wild and the rate I achieve is about 80%. I monitor them every day, many times a day! Caryl

    #32073

    notsotypicalblonde
    Participant

    Hi Caryl, it seem to be doing fine although I wont really know until I find out how it emerges or not.  I did rehang it but actually that didnt go well as it actually fell again while I was trying to rehang it and took an awful smack down on the plastic tray below.  Will update as things progress although things are slower down here in Dunedin and it can be much longer to wait

    Katrina :)

    #32069

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Perhaps it wasn’t healthy to begin with, and that is why the cremaster failed. The cremaster is the stem between the chrysalis and the plant.

    Keep watching – it might emerge and you’ll be very happy.

    #32068

    Caryl
    Participant

    Jacqui, Yes but there’s no sign of any movement or split in the chrysalis. I have so many cats – daily visits by multiple females. It’s beautiful. I monitor the cats and chrysalis many times a day!

    #32067

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    Carol, is your one next to something that it can climb up when it comes out?

    #32066

    Caryl
    Participant

    How is the chrysalis doing Katrina. After reading the replies I let one chrysalis lie flat and have watched it many times a day. It has turned the deepest black and I suspect it won’t hatch. I couldn’t tie it back on as there was only the tiny black stem left. Caryl, in Wellington.

    #31972

    Jacqui
    Keymaster

    It should be okay on the slant, Katrina. Any that fall off a leaf I just leave flat, and on the inside of a net “cage” so that as soon as they come out of the chrysalis they can climb up. That works fine. Carol (Auckland) has used a net curtain in a similar way.

    #31967

    Caryl
    Participant

    In my experience hanging near vertical is needed as some of the liquid in the butterfly’s abdomen leaks. Perhaps others will respond to assist you. I remove most of the chrysalis I find and tie them to a plant and keep them indoors in a sunny window. The survival rate from egg to butterfly in the wild I’ve read is about 5%. Are you able to retie it so it’s close to vertical?

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